During Your Trip Home for the Holidays; Find Out if Mom is Still a Safe Driver!

home_for_the_holidays

Many of us will be driving home this Thanksgiving to share a bountiful meal with family and friends.  During this annual tradition, families travel from far and near to get together to enjoy turkey, pumpkin pie, parades and professional football.  It has long been a time to give thanks for all that we have in our lives.  

Going home for the holidays has layers of significance for adult children, particularly those who live out of town. It remains a time of togetherness and thankfulness, but it’s also an opportunity to observe your aging family members to determine if their physical and cognitive skills are still sufficient for safe driving.  Following are three tips to help you gauge your loved one’s driving abilities on your next trip home:

Has your parent fallen in the past year? 

Recent research has established a definite correlation between falls and older driver crash involvement.  According to an article published by the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, older adults that have fallen two or more times in the previous year may be at a higher risk of being involved in an at-fault car crash.

Keeping Us Safe Fall Prevention

The study, conducted by the Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, and the School of Public Health at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, also reported that older drivers who fell two or more times in the prior year were 1.5 times as likely to be involved in an accident and two times as likely to be involved in an at-fault accident. 

The study’s bottom line; a history of frequent falling can serve as a valid indicator in identifying older drivers that are at a higher risk for future traffic accidents. 

That’s pretty significant!

Are your parents physically active?

Exercise can help improve an older driver’s flexibility, coordination, strength, balance and range of motion.  Simple stretching exercises can help an older driver look left or right more easily to check their blind spots, or to help ensure a safe lane change.  Exercise can also help an older driver turn their neck and body to look behind them before backing.  How many tragedies have we read about where an older driver backed over a pedestrian in a parking lot or in some cases, a family member in their own driveway?

exercise121

A 2014 study by The Hartford Center for Mature Market Excellence and the M.I.T. Age Lab looked at the drivers who exercised for 15-20 minutes daily.  The study participants reported greater ease in turning their heads to look in blind spots when changing lanes or backing up, compared with a similar group that did not exercise.  The exercise group could also rotate their bodies easily to scan the road when making right-hand turns compared with non-exercisers.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Senior Health website offers specific exercises on improving endurance, strength, flexibility and balance. 

How is your loved one’s memory holding up?

In the family setting, the issue surrounding the important role memory plays in older driver safety is often understated or even overlooked all together.  For obvious reasons, when we discuss age-related diminished driving skills in older adults, we tend to focus on the physical attributes of safe driving (vision, reflexes, strength, flexibility, hearing, etc.), and may overlook the crucial role memory plays in keeping older drivers safe.

memory111

For any one of us, a significant decline in our memory can lead to disaster if we continue to drive without first making appropriate adjustments in out driving behavior and habits.  Continuing to drive while ignoring noticeable memory decline can lead to tragedy, either through a car accident, or by unknowing becoming an excellent candidate for a victim of crime.

Older drivers that get lost may become confused and distracted by their unnerving circumstances.  As they find themselves unaware of their surroundings, they are likely to develop a strong case of tunnel vision.  The older driver may morph into a state of confusion, frustration and fear.  They lose their ability to focus on the task at hand (the physical act of driving) and instead, concentrate on getting themselves back to familiar surroundings.

The older driver’s ability to focus on driving has been overwhelmed by their desire to re-orient themselves.  In many cases, the individual may become scared and often times, tragedy becomes imminent.

Summary

Use your trip home this holiday season as a time to enjoy family and to give thanks for all that we have and have had.  Use it to re-unite with family and friends and to kick-off the holiday season, but also, take just a few minutes to make sure your parents’ physical and cognitive skills are still conducive to safe driving.   

If you believe there are concerns with a loved one’s driving skills, consider “Beyond Driving with Dignity; The workbook for the families of older drivers”, or Keeping Us Safe’s Enhanced Self-Assessment Program for older drivers. 

For further information, contact Keeping Us Safe at 877-907-8841 or by email at info@keepingussafe.org or visit our website at www.keepingussafe.org.  

 

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3 easy ways to double-check a loved one’s safe driving abilities this July 4th weekend

family cookout

Few days are more significant to American patriotism than the Fourth of July, in which we celebrate the signing of the Declaration of Independence.  That Declaration proclaimed to the world our separation from Great Britain and our emergence as a new sovereign nation, “Under God, with liberty and justice for all.”

As well as a time to celebrate our independence, the holiday serves as a great opportunity for millions of Americans to travel back home to reconnect with old friends and neighbors and to visit with family and loved ones.  As we celebrate country and family, the weekend is sure to be filled with picnics, barbeques, parades, and of course…fireworks.

Going home for the holidays has layers of significance for adult children, particularly those who live out of town. It remains a time of togetherness and love, but it can also be a great opportunity to observe your parents to determine if their physical and cognitive skills are still sufficient for safe driving. 

While visiting with loved-ones this weekend, ask yourself the following questions about an aging parent’s safe driving abilities:

Has your parent fallen in the past year?

Recent research has established a definite correlation between falls and older driver crash involvement.  According to an article published by the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, older adults that have fallen two or more times in the previous year may be at a higher risk of being involved in an at-fault car crash.  Keeping Us Safe Fall Prevention

The study, conducted by the Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, and the School of Public Health at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, also reported that older drivers who fell two or more times in the prior year were 1.5 times as likely to be involved in an accident and two times as likely to be involved in an at-fault accident.

The study’s bottom line; a history of frequent falling can serve as a valid indicator in identifying older drivers that are at a higher risk for future traffic accidents.  That’s pretty significant!

Are your parents physically active?

Exercise can help improve an older driver’s flexibility, coordination, strength, balance and range of motion.  Simple stretching exercises can help an older driver look left or right more easily to check their blind spots, or to help ensure a safe lane change.  Exercise can also help an older driver turn their neck and body to look behind them before backing.  How many tragedies have we read about where an older driver backed over a pedestrian in a parking lot or in some cases, a family member in their own driveway?

A 2014 study by The Hartford Center for Mature Market Excellence and the M.I.T. Age Lab looked at the drivers who exercised for 15-20 minutes daily.  The study participants reported greater ease in turning their heads to look in blind spots when changing lanes or backing up, compared with a similar group that did not exercise.  The exercise group could also rotate their bodies easily to scan the road when making right hand turns compared with non-exercisers.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Senior Health website offers specific exercises on improving endurance, strength, flexibility and balance.

How is your loved-one’s memory holding up?

In the family setting, the issue surrounding the important role memory plays in older driver safety is often understated or even overlooked all together.  For obvious reasons, when we discuss age related diminished driving skills in older adults, we tend to focus on the physical attributes of safe driving (vision, reflexes, strength, flexibility, hearing, etc.), and may overlook the crucial role memory plays in keeping older drivers safe. memory-supplements

For any one of us, a significant decline in our memory can lead to disaster if we continue to drive without first making appropriate adjustments in out driving behavior and habits.  Continuing to drive while ignoring noticeable memory decline can lead to tragedy, either through a car accident, or by unknowing becoming an excellent candidate for a victim of crime.

Older drivers that get lost may become confused and distracted by their unnerving circumstances.  As they find themselves unaware of their surroundings, they are likely to develop a strong case of tunnel vision.  The older driver may morph into a state of confusion, frustration and fear.  They lose their ability to focus on the task at hand (the physical act of driving) and instead, concentrate on getting themselves back to familiar surroundings.

The older driver’s ability to focus on driving has been overwhelmed by their desire to re-orient themselves.  In many cases, the individual may become scared and often times, tragedy becomes imminent.

A quick reminder for all of us

According to AAA, travel by car is expected to be up 1.2 percent over last year’s Independence Day, with 5 million more Americans hitting the road compared with the Memorial Day holiday just a few weeks ago. 

The stretch between Memorial Day and Labor Day is the 100 deadliest days of the year on the nation’s roads.  Independence Day finds itself right in the middle and even at the pinnacle of this deadly stretch.  The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety reports that July 4th is consistently the deadliest day of the year on America’s roadways.  Adrian Lund, president, IIHS. “If everyone buckles up, avoids distractions, obeys the speed limit and doesn’t drink and drive, we can make July Fourth and every day on the road a lot safer.”  That’s excellent advice for all of us!

Summary

Use your trip home for the holiday weekend as a time to humbly thank the individuals that gave us our Declaration of Independence, which will remain for future generations of Americans the beacon of liberty, the upholder of our divine unalienable rights, and the guardian of our independence.  Use it to re-unite with family and friends but also, use this time to take just a few minutes to make sure your parents’ physical and cognitive skills are still conducive to safe driving.

Conclusion

If you believe there are concerns with a loved-one’s driving skills, consider “Beyond Driving with Dignity; The workbook for the families of older drivers”, or Keeping Us Safe’s Enhanced Self-Assessment Program for older drivers.

To learn more about Keeping Us Safe’s programs, please visit our website at www.keepingussafe.org.  Specific inquiries made be made by email at info@keepingussafe.org or by telephone at 877-907-8841.

About the author:  Matt Gurwell is founder of Keeping Us Safe, LLC,  a national organization that provides practical, real-life solutions to older drivers and their families.   

Independence Day parade

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Unique Program Developed to Help Worried Employees Return to Productive, Engaged and Focused Workplace Contributors

EAP_signpost

The Purpose

The purpose of this article is to identify an issue that many of your employees are likely to experience throughout the course of their careers, and to offer employers a solution that will keep these valued employees from lapsing into a preventable state of distraction and worry in the first place.

It has been well documented that if employee problems are left un-addressed, they will ultimately have a negative impact on the organization’s bottom line.  According to a 2013 Gallop report, ‘active disengagement’ by employees costs United States employers an estimated $550 billion annually.  Combine this with the fact that an average of 15 people ages 65+ die in car accidents every day in the United States, and you now have a potential new problem in the workplace.

Earlier this year, Caring.com conducted a nationwide survey that showed a whopping 60% of family caregivers say their caregiving duties have a negative effect on their job.  In a similar study, MetLife reports that employees who are also caregivers cost employers at least 8% more in healthcare costs.  These same caregivers are often faced with the issue of worrying about mom or dad’s safety as drivers, which establishes the premise of this article.

The Problem

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reports that on average, we out live our safe driving years by 7-10 years.  For those of us still in the work force, that means there may very well come a day when we become concerned about a loved one’s safe driving abilities.  In its early days, those initial concerns are very manageable and will likely require no outside assistance.  However, if left unaddressed, those initial ‘concerns’ can easily morph into a deeper rooted worry or even fear, which is sure to erode the employee’s well-being and otherwise high level of productivity.

Beyond Driving with Dignity

To add to the complexity of the problem, the issue of taking the keys away from a parent has been known to divide entire families.  Adult siblings, otherwise close to each other their entire lives, can end up at war with each other (and/or with their parents) on how best to address the driving issue.  Imagine the stress this is likely to cause for an otherwise very productive employee.  In some cases, if not handled properly, this family issue can even result in tragedy.

One must wonder how many employees lost work time as a result of these preventable tragedies:

  • “Elderly man runs over, drags and kills woman at Costco gas station”, KTAR News,       Scottsdale, AZ
  • “Two 6-year-olds pinned against Walgreen’s wall by elderly driver”, ABC News, San     Francisco, CA
  • “Man, 77, crashes car into Maryland Sam’s Club; bystander needs amputation”, The     Huffington Post, New York, NY

The list of people adversely affected by any one of these completely avoidable tragedies is infinitely long.  Many lives have been affected…forever.  The short list of affected employees includes immediate family members of the older driver and the victims, extended family members, witnesses, property owners, neighbors, etc.

Imagine for a moment how heavy the hearts were of any adult children from the above tragedies when they finally returned to work.  Sadly, the employee may struggle, sometimes for the rest of their lives, with a sense of ‘I should have done more to get mom to quit driving.’

The Solution

employees-motivated-to-work-harder-when-appreciated

The sole mission and purpose of Keeping Us Safe and our “Beyond Driving with Dignity” program is to work with families to help older drivers with diminished driving skills make a smooth transition from the driver’s seat to the passenger seat before tragedy strikes.

Keeping Us Safe’s self-assessment program for older drivers is an early intervention program, designed (in part) to relieve a valued employee’s distress surrounding an elderly parent’s driving.

Having taken appropriate and effective action through timely use of the “Beyond Driving with Dignity” program, employees will no longer obsessively dwell on the driving safety of mom or dad. Your valued employees will be able to focus on organizational goals and job responsibilities and will not be distracted by concerns over their loved one’s safety and the risk they might be posing to others.  Bringing a peaceful resolve to the senior’s driving issue will surely bring the worried employee’s concentration, focus and organizational skills back to the expected level of performance.

Conclusion

According to AARP, boomers will be turning 65 at a rate of about 8,000 a day for the next 18 years!  Professionals, academia and the general public often refer to this trend as the Silver Tsunami.  The issue of age related diminished driving skills is not going away anytime soon.  It has been said that organizations that do not have a plan in place to address the driving issue with families, will soon be surpassed by the ones that do.

Keeping Us Safe’s “Beyond Driving with Dignity” program can help employers:

  • Decrease healthcare costs
  • Enhance employee well-being
  • Increase employee productivity
  • Improve employee engagement
  • Reduce employee absenteeism, and
  • Strengthened recruitment and employee retention

In addition to saving lives, proper utilization of this program will arm managers with yet another tool in dealing with difficult, complex and sensitive employee issues.  If you are an employer, human resource coordinator, benefits coordinator or an EAP professional, and are interested in learning more about this problem-solving program, please feel free to contact us at 877-907-8841, or visit the Keeping Us Safe website at www.keepingussafe.org.

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3 Tips to Help Monitor Older Driver Abilities This Memorial Day Weekend

Memorial-Day

Memorial Day, an American holiday observed on the last Monday of May, honors men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military.  Many Americans observe Memorial Day by visiting cemeteries or memorials, holding family gatherings, picnics and participating in parades. Unofficially, at least, it marks the beginning of summer.

But did you know that historically, the stretch between Memorial Day and Labor Day is the 100 deadliest days of the year on the nation’s roads?  The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) says that Memorial Day weekend is the single most dangerous weekend on America’s roads.

Deborah A.P. Hersman, president and CEO of the National Safety Council says “As Americans gear up for the most carefree months of the year, we cannot take our safety for granted.  Driving is one of the riskiest things we do every day. Engaging our defensive driving skills and staying alert can mean the difference between attending cookouts and family parties or spending the evening at the emergency room or worse.”

Ms. Hersman’s comments are spot-on.  Going home for the holidays has layers of significance for adult children, particularly those who live out of town. It remains a time of togetherness and love, but it’s also an opportunity to observe your parents to determine if their physical and cognitive skills are still sufficient for safe driving.  Following are three tips to help you gauge your loved-one’s driving abilities:

Has your parent fallen in the past year?

Keeping Us Safe Fall Prevention

Recent research has established a definite correlation between falls and older driver crash involvement.  According to an article published by the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, older adults that have fallen two or more times in the previous year may be at a higher risk of being involved in an at-fault car crash.

The study, conducted by the Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, and the School of Public Health at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, also reported that older drivers who fell two or more times in the prior year were 1.5 times as likely to be involved in an accident and two times as likely to be involved in an at-fault accident.

The study’s bottom line; a history of frequent falling can serve as a valid indicator in identifying older drivers that are at a higher risk for future traffic accidents.  That’s pretty significant!

Are your parents physically active?

Exercise can help improve an oldKeeping Us Safe Exercise and Older Driverser driver’s flexibility, coordination, strength, balance and range of motion.  Simple stretching exercises can help an older driver look left or right more easily to check their blind spots, or to help ensure a safe lane change.  Exercise can also help an older driver turn their neck and body to look behind them before backing.  How many tragedies have we read about where an older driver backed over a pedestrian in a parking lot or in some cases, a family member in their own driveway?

A 2014 study by The Hartford Center for Mature Market Excellence and the M.I.T. Age Lab looked at the drivers who exercised for 15-20 minutes daily.  The study participants reported greater ease in turning their heads to look in blind spots when changing lanes or backing up, compared with a similar group that did not exercise.  The exercise group could also rotate their bodies easily to scan the road when making right hand turns compared with non-exercisers.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Senior Health website offers specific exercises on improving endurance, strength, flexibility and balance.

How is your loved-one’s memory holding up?

In the family setting, the issue surrounding the important role memory plays in older driver safety is often understated or even overlooked all together.  For obvious reasons, when we discuss age related diminished driving skills in older adults, we tend to focus on the physical attributes of safe driving (vision, reflexes, strength, flexibility, hearing, etc.), and may overlook the crucial role memory plays in keeping older drivers safe.

Beyond Driving with Dignity

For any one of us, a significant decline in our memory can lead to disaster if we continue to drive without first making appropriate adjustments in out driving behavior and habits.  Continuing to drive while ignoring noticeable memory decline can lead to tragedy, either through a car accident, or by unknowing becoming an excellent candidate for a victim of crime.

Older drivers that get lost may become confused and distracted by their unnerving circumstances.  As they find themselves unaware of their surroundings, they are likely to develop a strong case of tunnel vision.  The older driver may morph into a state of confusion, frustration and fear.  They lose their ability to focus on the task at hand (the physical act of driving) and instead, concentrate on getting themselves back to familiar surroundings.

The older driver’s ability to focus on driving has been overwhelmed by their desire to re-orient themselves.  In many cases, the individual may become scared and often times, tragedy becomes imminent.

Summary

Use your trip home for the holiday weekend as a time to honor the men and women that have sacrificed their lives for our Country.  Use it to re-unite with family and friends and to kick-off the start of summer, but also, take just a few minutes to make sure your parents’ physical and cognitive skills are still conducive to safe driving.

If you believe there are concerns with a loved-one’s driving skills, consider “Beyond Driving with Dignity; The workbook for the families of older drivers”, or Keeping Us Safe’s Enhanced Self-Assessment Program for older drivers.

To learn more about Keeping Us Safe’s programs, please visit our website at www.keepingussafe.org.  Specific inquiries made be made by email at info@keepingussafe.org or by telephone at 877-907-8841.

About the author:  Matt Gurwell is founder of Keeping Us Safe, LLC,  a national organization that provides practical, real-life solutions to older drivers and their families.   

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The Workbook for Older Drivers & Their Families

Do you wonder if the older driver in your family may be experiencing diminishing drivingKeeping us Safe Beyond Driving with Dignityskills as a result of the natural aging process?

Has your parent become lost recently while driving on an otherwise familiar route?  Have you noticed mom bumping into curbs, mailboxes, or scraping the side of the garage when she backs out?  Are there unexplained scuff marks on the corners of dad’s bumpers?  Has dad been involved in a minor parking lot fender-bender recently, or does he complain about being honked at all the time?  Do either of them seem easily confused or more forgetful when you talk with them on the telephone?

If so, don’t panic; you are certainly not alone.  The most important thing to remember is that the time to start addressing your concerns over driving is now, before “concerns” turn into “tragedies”.

Facts:  According to AARP, boomers will be turning 65 at a rate of about 8,000 a day for the next 18 years!  Tragically, an average of 15 people ages 65+ die in car accidents every day in the United States

The issue of taking the keys away from a parent can be extremely sensitive and emotional.  Having this discussion has been likened to trying to throw a diplomatic hand grenade at your parents and the “talk” has been known to divide entire families.  Adult siblings, otherwise close to each other their entire lives, can end up at war with each other (and/or with their parents) on how best to address the driving issue.

There is a solution; Keeping Us Safe has developed a workbook titled “Beyond Driving with Dignity; The workbook for older drivers and their families”.

The workbook employs a very user-friendly, uncomplicated method and is designed to be used in the comfort and confidence of the family’s home.  It has been designed to remove the family’s emotion, opinion and speculation from the decision making process, and reduces everything to simple fact so that appropriate decisions can follow.

More specifically, the workbook helps the family and the older driver better recognize any deficiencies in the following dimensions:

  • Vision
  • Hearing
  • Memory
  • Reflex and reaction time
  • Strength and flexibility
  • Medications, and
  • Overall health concerns

“The workbook was written to help families (or professionals working with families) by providing them with a ‘roadmap to success’ in their quest to overcome the challenges of an older driver’s safety” explains Matt Gurwell, founder and CEO of Keeping Us Safe.

Gurwell adds “If driving restrictions or even a complete retirement from driving are deemed appropriate, the ‘Limit Driving, Not Living’ chapter of the workbook helps the family identify and implement alternative means of transportation for the retiring driver.”

Working through this instrument will help concerned families make appropriate driving-related decisions that are not only in the best interest of the older driver, but simultaneously find themselves in the best interest of highway safety in general. This workbook was designed to be used by the family in the confidence and comfort of their own home, most likely seated right at the family’s kitchen table.

To purchase a workbook or to learn more about how the workbook can help your family or client, visit the Keeping Us Safe website at www.keepingussafe.org.

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Ohio State Highway Patrol partners with Keeping Us Safe to prevent older driver tragedies

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The Ohio State Highway Patrol is pleased to announce a new partnership with two organizations dedicated to keeping older drivers safe on the roads of the Mahoning Valley: SCOPE of Trumbull County (Senior Citizen’s Opportunity for Personal Endeavor) and Keeping Us Safe.

In conjunction with the Warren Post of the Ohio State Highway Patrol, SCOPE will sponsor Keeping Us Safe’s “A Safe Drive Through the Aging Process” presentation throughout March and April.

Keeping Us Safe is a national organization that works with older drivers and their families with the issue of age-related diminishing driving skills. The one-hour long presentation, free to the public, will offer suggestions on how an older driver can extend his or her safe driving career.

The program stresses the importance of staying aware of diminishing physical and cognitive skills as we age, as well as making appropriate adjustments in driving behavior to compensate for a decline in those skills.  Read more at Media Release-OSP Warren Partnership.

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A Completely Solvable Problem!

Car Accident-Keepig Us Safe

 

According to the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), olderadults account for 10 percent of all people injured in traffic crashes annually and 17 percent of annual traffic fatalities.  Keeping Us Safe’s Enhanced Self-Assessment Program (ESAP) for older drivers can help drive this statistic down!  Beyond Driving with Dignity

 

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Continuing Education Programs to Help Older Drivers and Their Families Now Available to Nurses in Wyoming

 

nurses14

Keeping Us Safe is pleased to announce that their nationally-recognized presentations for nurses has been accepted for Continuing Education (CEU) credits in the state of Wyoming.   Following are brief descriptions of each presentation:

Bringing a Peaceful Resolve to Complex & Sensitive Senior Driving Issues

This 1-hour educational presentation is designed to provide Wyoming’s nurses with the skills and competencies necessary to help an individual (and their concerned family members) suffering from age-related diminished driving skills with the ability to make a smooth transition into a driving retirement, with minimal deterioration to the individual’s dignity or independence.

Driving Under the Influence of Dementia

This presentation, also 1-hour in length, is designed to provide nurses in Wyoming with the skills and competencies necessary to address the issue of dementia-related cognitive decline as it relates to older drivers.  Attendees will gain a further understanding of the role memory and executive functioning play in safe driving, and how dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease can have an adverse effect on those critical brain functions and thus on driving abilities.

The presentation includes discussion on recent research projects related to the issue of driving with dementia and will offer potential solutions for the family and for the driver with dementia in their quest to maintain their independence and a healthy lifestyle even after driving cessation.

Pursuant to the rules established by the Wyoming State Board of Nursing, nurses licensed in the state of Wyoming are now eligible to earn Continuing Education credits (CEU’s) for attending and participating in either course.

Matt Gurwell, founder of Keeping Us Safe, explains that “A fundamental component of our mission is to provide educational support for members of the professional community that may find themselves in the difficult position of helping families deal with this very sensitive and emotional issue.  We are delighted that the State of Wyoming has recognized the need for such programs and we are honored that they have entrusted us to deliver this information to Wyoming’s nursing community.

Founded in 2008, Keeping Us Safe is an organization that provides practical, real-life solutions to older drivers and their families. Their programs are designed to save lives while simultaneously helping to ease the burden of the family as they find themselves faced with this very challenging issue. Their services are available throughout the United States and Canada.  To learn more about their programming or to schedule a continuing education presentation please visit the Keeping Us Safe website at http://www.keepingussafe.org or call toll-free 877-907-8841.

welcome-to-wyoming

 

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Educational Programs to Help Older Drivers and Their Families Now Available to Social Workers in Colorado

colorado

(Denver, CO) – Keeping Us Safe is pleased to announce that their nationally-recognized presentations for social workers is now being offered as Professional Development Hours (PDH) in the state of Colorado.  Following are brief descriptions of each presentation:

Bringing a Peaceful Resolve to Complex & Sensitive Senior Driving Issues

This 1-hour educational presentation is designed to provide social workers with the skills and competencies necessary to help an individual (and their concerned family members) suffering from age-related diminished driving skills with the ability to make a smooth transition into a driving retirement, with minimal deterioration to the individual’s dignity or independence.

Driving Under the Influence of Dementia

This presentation, also 1-hour in length, is designed to provide social workers with the skills and competencies necessary to address the issue of dementia-related cognitive decline as it relates to older drivers.  Attendees will gain a further understanding of the role memory and executive functioning play in safe driving, and how dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease can have an adverse effect on those critical brain functions and thus on driving abilities.

The presentation includes discussion on recent research projects related to the issue of driving with dementia and will offer potential solutions for the family and for the driver with dementia in their quest to maintain their independence and a healthy lifestyle even after driving cessation.

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Pursuant to the rules established by the Colorado State Board of Social Work Examiners, a component of the Colorado Department of Regulatory Agencies, Licensed Social Workers (LSW), and Licensed Clinical Social Workers (LCSW) are now eligible to earn Professional Development Hours (PDH) for attending and participating in either course.

Matt Gurwell, founder of Keeping Us Safe, explains that “A fundamental component of our mission is to provide educational support for members of the professional community that may find themselves in the difficult position of helping families deal with this very sensitive and emotional issue”.

Founded in 2008, Keeping Us Safe is an organization that provides practical, real-life solutions to older drivers and their families. Their programs are designed to save lives while simultaneously helping to ease the burden of the family as they find themselves faced with this very challenging issue. Their services are available throughout the United States and Canada.  To learn more about their programming or to schedule a continuing education presentation please visit the Keeping Us Safe website at http://www.keepingussafe.org or call toll-free 877-907-8841.

 

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Keeping Us Safe Presents Its Continuing Education (CEU) Program to Parish Nurses in Cincinnati, Ohio

Continuing-Ed

On January 27, 2016, Certified “Beyond Driving with Dignity” Professional Nancy Schuster (Cincinnati, Ohio) will be presenting Keeping Us Safe’s “Driving Under the Influence of Dementia” continuing education program to parish nurses of the Greater Cincinnati Parish Health Ministry.

Those in attendance will gain a further understanding of the role memory and executive functioning play in safe driving, and how dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease can have an adverse effect on those critical brain functions and driving abilities.

The presentation includes a discussion on recent research projects related to the issue of driving with dementia and will offer potential solutions for families and for the driver with dementia in their quest to maintain their independence and a healthy lifestyle even after driving cessation.

Keeping Us Safe - Nancy Schuster

Nancy Schuster

Nancy Schuster has been serving the greater Cincinnati area as a Certified “Beyond Driving with Dignity” Professional since August, 2011.  In 2013 she received Keeping Us Safe’s “Bill and Betty Fresch Outstanding Achievement Award” for her exemplary performance in the certification program.

Click here to learn more about Keeping Us Safe’s continuing education programs.

 

 

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