Columbus Dispatch Article: “How to persuade an elderly relative to stop driving”

Keeping Us Safe-Columbus Dispatch

The article appeared in the Columbus Dispatch on November 14, 2014, and made positive reference to Keeping Us Safe’s “Enhanced Self-Assessment Program” for older drivers.

The author, Joe Blundo wrote…

Matt Gurwell, a retired trooper for the State Highway Patrol, has a Cleveland-based business, Keeping Us Safe, devoted to being the third party who, when necessary, delivers the bad driving news.

For $350, he (or another staff member) will meet with elderly drivers for a three-hour session, much of it devoted to assessment of their cognitive skills, such as memory. If he thinks it’s safe, he’ll ride with clients to see how they do behind the wheel, too.

“Two-thirds of the people actually retire from driving during the session,” he said.

Two years ago, Laura Cox of Westerville hired Gurwell to assess her mother, a Cleveland resident who was 77 at the time and showing signs of impaired memory. She had, for example, become lost on the way to a familiar Walmart.

At the end of the assessment, Gurwell told her that she needed to give up the keys, and — much to Cox’s relief — she agreed.

“She was still mad as heck at me when he left,” Cox said, “but I wasn’t so much the bad guy anymore.”

Read the entire article here.

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When to Put the Brakes on Your Loved-One’s Driving

 

Keeping Us Safe-Alzheimer's Foundation of America

 

Keeping Us Safe will be presenting “When to Put the Brakes on Your Loved-One’s Driving” to family caregivers as well as healthcare professionals as part of the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America’s ‘Care Connection’ program.  The segment is scheduled for November 13, 2014.

Care Connection, is a national telephone support network for family and professional caregivers sponsored by the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America—a national non-profit organizations whose mission is to provide optimal care and services to individuals affected by dementia and their families.

“It is an honor to have been selected to participate in the AFA’s Care Connection program” says Matt Gurwell, founder of Keeping Us Safe.  “Addressing the issue of a driving retirement with a loved one can be a very sensitive and emotional issue and must be handled with tact, empathy and compassion.  I am very excited to for the opportunity to share some helpful tips and suggestions with Care Connection listeners.”

Headquartered in Cleveland, Ohio, Keeping Us Safe is a national organization with a mission of providing practical, real-life solutions to older drivers and their families as they face the challenging issue of age-related diminishing driving skills.   “Our ‘Beyond Driving with Dignity’ program provides concerned families with the missing link between their desire to bring the driving issue to a peaceful resolution, and their ability to actually do so.”  Gurwell added.

Care Connection allows family caregivers and professionals nationwide to gain valuable education from guest speakers on a vast array of topics as well as to connect with other caregivers from across the country.  Plus, they can get much-needed help and advice from the comfort of their own homes or jobs.  As well, Care Connection offers CEUs for professionals who are part of our Dementia Care Professionals of America division.

The teleconference is scheduled for 1PM (EST) on November 13, 2014.  To join the conversation or to learn more about the Care Connection program please visit http://www.alzfdn.org/AFAServices/careconnection.html

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Keeping Us Safe Celebrates 6 Years of Public Service

Keeping Us Safe AnniversaryThis week, Keeping Us Safe proudly celebrates six years of providing services to older drivers and their families.  Founded on November 3, 2008, Keeping Us Safe has dedicated itself to improving the mortality rate of older drivers, while simultaneously providing an invaluable service to concerned families.

Keeping Us Safe’s Greatest Honor in 2014:

When asked what he was most proud of during the past year, Matt Gurwell, founder of Keeping Us Safe explained “It was the development of the ‘Bill and Betty Fresch Outstanding Achievement Award’, which is now awarded annually to the one Certified “Beyond Driving with Dignity” Professional who has gone above and beyond our expectations in helping to deliver this program to the community.  The award is named after Bill and Betty Fresch of Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, who, after becoming lost while driving in January, 2011, were found days later frozen to death in a farm field in Frederick County, Maryland.”

Gurwell adds “It is a huge honor to have gotten to know the Fresch family.  They are a very caring, loving and compassionate family who always looked out for their parents.  The family had taken many steps to help keep their parents safe while driving, but unfortunately, their parents’ diminishing cognitive abilities exceeded the safeties the family had put in place.”

“This story, and many others like it, serve as a constant reminder to me personally of not only how precious life is, but also how critically important the issue of properly addressing diminished driving skills is.” explains Gurwell.  “The courage the Fresch family has demonstrated in publicly sharing their story in hopes of keeping a similar tragedy from striking other families is both commendable and remarkable.  Having the Fresch family agree to name this award after their parents is Keeping Us Safe’s greatest honor, not only for 2014, but in our entire business tenure.”

Keeping Us Safe’s Greatest Achievement in 2014:

Gurwell attributes the success of Keeping Us Safe directly to the quality, dedication and professionalism of its Certified “Beyond Driving with Dignity” (BDD) Professionals.  He explains that collectively, they represent Keeping Us Safe’s greatest achievement for the year.  “The passion and dedication displayed by each and every one of our BDD Professionals is beyond reproach” Gurwell explains.

These individuals, deployed in communities across the United States and Canada, have been trained and certified by Keeping Us Safe to facilitate its “self-assessment program” for older drivers.

Keeping Us Safe’s Certified “Beyond Driving with Dignity” Professionals are on the front line, working with older drivers and their families every day.  Put another way, they are saving lives and providing untold relief to concerned families on a daily basis.  Gurwell refers to Keeping Us Safe’s BDD Professionals as some of life’s unsung heroes.  “They are very good at what they do”, Gurwell explains, “and that is providing families with the missing link between their desire to bring this issue to a peaceful resolution, and their ability to actually do so.”

“As an organization, we have used our years of experience to better define the attributes of a successful applicant into the certification program.  We are now far more selective in the types of professionals that are accepted into the program, and not everyone that applies is accepted.  We still have active members from our very first training session held in August, 2011; in many ways those earlier pioneers serve as mentors for our newer members.” Gurwell explained.

“Having the good fortune of working with such high quality professionals has been very humbling,” Gurwell explains, “each and every one of our BDD Professionals is representative of Keeping Us Safe’s greatest achievement.”

A Family Recently Touched by Keeping Us Safe:

Last month, one of Keeping Us Safe’s Certified “Beyond Driving with Dignity” Professionals facilitated a self-assessment with a lovely older driver who resides outside of Dayton, Ohio.  After the session, the family submitted the following correspondence:

Our mother was 93 years old this year and was driving only in town, where the speed limit is 25 mph for her daily errands. When we were recently notified by the local police of their observations and reports from residents concerned for her safety, the family didn’t feel ready to ask her to stop driving.

After a few months, one family member learned of “Keeping Us Safe” and their programs designed for older drivers. When reading about their founder’s professional background as a state trooper and his personal commitment for this growing need in our aging population, it felt like a perfect fit to schedule a one-on-one session. Their conversational approach through personal and driving abilities was a foundation for us to follow through on the recommendation that “the time for her to stop driving was now”.

As well as the individualized session with our mother, information provided in their “Beyond Driving with Dignity” workbook provided a solid guideline for communicating our decision and for making plans for her transportation needs in a way that allowed her to participate and even enjoy allowing others to drive.  Of course there was emotion and resistance to the idea at first, but it only lasted for one day before she was proudly declaring to caretakers, friends and family that “she” was giving up driving.

We are all so relieved and surprised that the transition went as smoothly as it did.  It can only be due to the personal level of care and experiential assessment that was provided for us and our mother.  If this has been on your mind for your loved one, please don’t wait another day.

Terri Eastman, Yellow Springs, Ohio

“It is very rewarding to receive positive feedback like this from families who have used our services to help a loved-one make a smooth transition from the driver’s seat to the passenger seat.” stated Gurwell.   These comments serve to validate the life-saving services provided by Keeping Us Safe’s dedicated “Beyond Driving with Dignity” Professionals.

Perhaps Diane Walz, Certified BDD Professional from Sarasota, Florida put it best when she explained “Helping families is not what we do…it’s who we are.”

For additional information on Keeping Us Safe’s programs and services, please visit their website at www.keepingussafe.org or call toll-free at 877-907-8841.

Keeping Us Safe - Nancy Schuster

Nancy Schuster

Editor’s Notes: 

  • Jo Rinehart, daughter of the late Bill and Betty Fresch, now serves on Keeping Us Safe’s five- member Executive Vision Committee.
  • The 2014 winner of the ‘Bill and Betty Fresch Outstanding Achievement Award’ was Certified “Beyond Driving with Dignity” Professional Nancy Schuster, MBA, of Cincinnati, Ohio.
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TV Interview: “Ending Driving with Dignity”

Keeping Us Safe-Golden Opportunities

Matt Gurwell, founder of Keeping Us Safe, appears on WKYC (NBC) Channel 3′s Golden Opportunities show in a segment titled “Ending Driving with Dignity”.

Watch the video segment here.

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Make a Positive Difference in YOUR Community

Keeping Us Safe-Helping OthersKeeping Us Safe has released the November schedule of introductory webinars for individuals interested in becoming one of the nation’s Certified “Beyond Driving with Dignity” Professionals.

The webinar is for qualifying professionals interested in:

  • Making a positive difference in your community
  • Learning a new skill that will challenge and reward you at the same time
  • Being challenged on an interpersonal level as you problem solve for families
  • Expanding the current marketing reach of your business or non-profit organization
  • Making yourself or your organization even more marketable to your internal and external customers?
  • Becoming part of an emerging, national team of experts in facilitating Keeping Us Safe’s “self-assessment program for older drivers™”?

In addition to saving lives, it is worthy to note that becoming certified in the “Beyond Driving with Dignity” program is an excellent way to further your personal revenue stream, or to further the professional revenue stream (and marketing efforts!) of your business or organization.

If you are interested in becoming part of our team, we cordially invite you to join us for this 30 minute, quick-paced, informational webinar on the benefits of becoming certified in this nationally-recognized program.  These complimentary webinars will be offered as follows:

  • November 7, 2014 at 2PM (EST)
  • November 13, 2014 at 5PM (EST)
  • November 19, 2014 at 11AM (EST)
  • November 25, 2014 at 3PM (EST)

To register for any one of the webinars please visit:http://keepingussafe.org/becomingacbddprofessional.htm.

For more information on the certification program you may also download our brochure at: http://keepingussafe.org/linked/brochurebddprofessionalcertification011314.pdf

To learn more about Keeping Us Safe’s programs, please visit our website at http://www.keepingussafe.org.  Specific inquiries made be made by email at info@keepingussafe.org or by telephone at 877-907-8841.

 

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Older Drivers; Better Historians Than Visionaries

Beyond Driving with DignityIn an essay that recently appeared on the Huffington Post blog, the writer described the challenge he faced when trying to convince his 83 year-old father, afflicted with mild dementia and now a widower, to retire from driving.  The adult child describes how several months of stressful dialogue on the subject were followed by his father’s failed driving assessment, and most recently, a very intense and emotional conversation between son and father, with dad’s final argument on the issue being a very sincere and frank “I don’t know why I can’t drive, I haven’t killed anybody yet.”

The older drivers at the center of this debate of age-related diminishing driving skills are from what Tom Brokaw refers to as The Greatest Generation.  My experiences have taught me that Mr. Brokaw’s assessment is very appropriate and accurate.  These are individuals filled with pride and loyalty, love for family and country, and a class of workers who possess a work ethic likely to never been seen again.

Unfortunately though, as America’s most valuable resource begins to age, their driving skills may begin to decline accordingly.

As a retired Ohio State Trooper, I jokingly (somewhat) like to say “I have yet to meet an older driver who didn’t think he or she was the best driver in the world”.  As the founder of Keeping Us Safe, I have had the good fortune to meet and work with many older drivers as they find themselves faced with diminishing driving skills.  My experiences have brought me to recognize a problem, and that is that older drivers are almost always better historians than they are visionaries.

Older drivers are typically very proud of their driving record, and rightfully so.  Many have driven for 70 or 80 years without ever having a single accident, a good talking to by the police, or even a minor fender-bender.  That’s an accomplishment that many of us would be proud of us well.  For me to go 80 years without having an accident, I would need to live to be at least 120 years-old, which is not likely for several reasons not worthy of note here.

Residing in the greater Tampa area, an 86 year-old veteran of WWII and his wife enjoyed the routine of driving to church every Sunday morning to attend worship services.  Mr. “Jones” stated that he had never been involved in an at-fault accident, this after over a half-century of driving.  Being a good historian, Mr. Jones knew that this Sunday would be no different.  After all, his driving skills had served him very well up to this point, so why would they fail him today?

Mr. Jones and his lovely wife followed the same routine weekly; back the car out of the garage, drive to church, from there drive to their favorite nearby restaurant for Sunday brunch, and then of course, back home.  This particular Sunday was no different.  Back out of the garage, check.  Drive to church, check.   Drive to the restaurant, check.

Arriving at the restaurant, Mr. Jones pulled into a coveted parking spot directly in front of the restaurant’s large picture window.  In a failed parking maneuver, he confused the brake pedal with the gas pedal, and lunged his vehicle forward over the parking block, across the sidewalk, and then completely into the crowded restaurant.  Sadly, nine people, sitting at their respective dinner tables enjoying a Sunday meal with family and friends, were injured, two of them suffered life threatening injuries.

Mr. Jones, like so many others, was basing today’s driving abilities on past performance, which is a very natural path for any one of us to take.  However, this paradigm needs to be adjusted if we hope to remain safe drivers as we age.  It is critically important (lives depend on it) that we shift our focus and attention on our safe driving skills from a historic perspective to more of a visionary approach.

When talking about older driver safety, past behavior is not a valid predictor of future performance.  According to the American Automobile Association (AAA), we are outliving our ability to drive safely by 7-10 years, further supporting the notion that we all need to improve our visionary skills, as we will not always be able to hang our hat on a historic look back on our driving performance.

For good reason, the men and women of the aforementioned generation are role models that we can be proud to have.  It would be a very sad day to lose a single member of this generation to a completely preventable automobile tragedy.  Considering safe driving abilities from a visionary perspective as opposed to a historical perspective will help us appreciate even more the long and successful driving career enjoyed by the contributors to Our Greatest Generation.

Submitted by Matt Gurwell, founder of Keeping Us Safe, LLC. Matt works with older drivers to help them determine whether they are still safe drivers. Visit his website at www.keepingussafe.org to learn more about their Enhanced Self-Assessment Program, designed specifically for senior drivers, or to schedule a presentation for your group, business, or organization.

 

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CBS (Dayton) News Channel 7: “Ohio State Patrol and Keeping Us Safe partner to prevent older driver tragedies”

Watch the CBS news story by clicking here.

 Keeping Us Safe WHIO

In addition to Keeping Us Safe’s “A Safe Drive Through the Aging Process“, we also offer a presentation titled “Adults with Aging Parent Drivers“, which is very popular for adult children worried about mom or dad’s safe driving abilities.

Continuing education programs (CEU’s) are available for nurses, social workers, nursing home administrators, law enforcement and clergy members, etc.

If you are interested in bringing one of our nationally-recognized presentations to your group or organization, please contact Keeping Us Safe at 877-907-8841 or by email at info@keepingussafe.org.  More information on our programs is available by visiting the Keeping Us Safe website at www.keepingussafe.org.

We’d love to help!!

 

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Keeping Us Safe Partners With the Ohio State Highway Patrol to Prevent Older Driver Tragedies

Keeping Us Safe is pleased to announce a new partnership between its organization and the Ohio State Highway Patrol to help prevent older driver fatalities in the greater Miami County, Ohio area.

The Piqua Post of the Ohio State Highway Patrol will be sponsoring Keeping Us Safe’s “A Safe Drive Through the Aging Process” presentation on October 17, 2014.  The event will be hosted by the Robinson Branch of the Miami County YMCA.

Keeping Us Safe is a national organization that works with older drivers and their families Keeping Us Safe-A Safe Drive Through the Aging processwhen the issue of age-related diminishing driving skills arises.  The one-hour presentation, free to the public, will offer suggestions on how an older driver can extend his or her safe driving career.  The program stresses the importance of staying aware of diminishing skills (physical and cognitive) as we age, and making appropriate adjustments in our driving behavior to compensate for a decline in those skills.

Last year in Ohio, 123 individuals age 65 and older were killed in traffic crashes.  Keeping Us Safe’s programs are designed to significantly reduce those numbers, both in Ohio and across the country.  “Meaningful partnerships between government agencies and the private sector can prove invaluable in solving public safety challenges.” says Matt Gurwell, founder of Keeping Us Safe, “It is an honor to be working with the Ohio State Highway Patrol on this life-saving initiative.”

According to AARP, boomers will be turning 65 at a rate of about 8,000 per day for the next 18 years!  Tragically, an average of 15 people ages 65+ die in car accidents every day across the United States.  “The issue of older drivers with diminished driving skills can be a very complex, sensitive and emotional family issue” Gurwell explains, “Our programs help older drivers extend their safe driving careers, or when necessary, help them make a smooth transition into a driving retirement, with minimal erosion to their pride, dignity, or independence.”

The presentation is being hosted by the Robinson Branch of the Miami County YMCA, located at 3060 S. CR 25A, Troy, Ohio 45373.  The program will begin at 10AM on Friday, October 17, 2014.  For more information contact Donn Craig at 937-440-9622.   Family members and friends are also invited to attend.

To learn more about Keeping Us Safe’s programs, please visit their website at www.keepingussafe.org.  Specific inquiries made be made by email at info@keepingussafe.org or by telephone at 877-907-8841.

Don’t give tragedy the opportunity to strike your family or your community; help is available!

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Parkinson’s Disease; When Is Driving No Longer Safe?

The DiseaseKeeping Us Safe Parkinsons Disease

The Parkinson’s Disease Foundation reports that as many as one million Americans live with Parkinson’s disease.  Rooted deep within the brain, the disease is a movement disorder that is both chronic and progressive, meaning that the symptoms are likely to continue and will probably worsen over time.  Although there is no known cure for the disease, medicine and treatment options can make the disorder more manageable.

This mysterious disease, whose cause is still unknown, was discovered in 1817 by British physician James Parkinson.  Only about 4% of Americans diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease are diagnosed before the age of 50, the remaining 96% are diagnosed in their later years.

As with so many other neurological disorders, the physical symptoms associated with Parkinson’s disease vary from person to person, but typically include tremors, slowness of movements, limb and muscle stiffness, problems with standing and coordination, impaired balance, and an overall decline in motor skills.  Cognitive symptoms of the disease may include an erosion of thinking and/or language, as well as visuospatial and problem-solving skills.

To complicate matters, anxiety and depression have proven to be common occurrences for those afflicted with Parkinson’s, as the world observed first-hand with the tragic and untimely passing of actor Robin Williams.  Seventy-five percent of patients with the disease are likely to experience cognitive impairment and up to 40% will develop some form of dementia.

The Medications

Parkinson’s medications have a well-documented history of producing side effects such as sleepiness, dizziness, blurred vision and confusion.

Levodopa is a common drug used for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease symptoms.  It is most effective for those patients experiencing rigidity and difficulties moving all or part of their body (akinesia). Common side effects of levodopa include sleepiness, dizziness, confusion, agitation, which over time may advance to hallucinations, delusions and even psychosis.  Long term use of levodopa is also associated with motor fluctuations and dyskinesias (abnormal, involuntary movements that cause rapid jerking or slow and extended muscle spasms).

Anticholinergics, also used to treat the symptoms of Parkinson’s, are a class of drugs that block the action of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in the brain, and help slow involuntary movements of the muscles.  Unfortunately, they are also known to cause confusion, sedation and memory impairment.

A Short Story

Intrigued by the mysteriousness of the disease, and wanting to learn more about the impact it has on its victim’s driving abilities, I have had the good fortune to attend several Parkinson’s support group meetings.  One particular, well-attended meeting was led by a local physician who was discussing the merits of deep-brain stimulation surgery and how it can, in some cases, be used to drastically reduce the symptoms associated with the disease.

Near the end of the doctor’s presentation, an older gentleman in the back of the room stood up and asked “The other night I was driving home and I saw a car coming towards me.  As it got closer, the two oncoming headlights morphed into three headlights.  It scared me but somehow I made it past the oncoming car safely.  If that happens again, what should I do…just aim for the middle headlight?”  The gentleman, a retired farmer, was very serious with his question and displayed not a hint of humor.  Rather, his face exhibited concern and fear.

Being uneducated on the issue of the side effects of Parkinson’s medications, I was startled by the seriousness of the farmer’s question.  I was equally surprised to see that the audience saw the merit in the question and that they were very interested to hear the physician’s advice on how to handle similar situations.  It was as if everyone in the room had experienced this or a very similar situation in the past.

The Driving Issue

One can easily imagine the adverse effects these symptoms, and the medications designed to ease them, can have on an individual’s ability to safely operate a motor vehicle.  It is very important that the person afflicted with Parkinson’s disease remain responsible about his or her actions, and must never forget the potential dangers the disease presents to driving.

Not giving ample attention to the effects of the disease and its medications will create an even more dangerous driving environment for those afflicted.  As the disease continues to progress, it will eventually affect reaction time, vision, judgment and one’s ability to handle the multiple tasks required for safe driving.

When the physical and cognitive symptoms of Parkinson’s disease begin to erode the individual’s ability to safely operate a motor vehicle, steps should be taken to retire from what was probably a long and successful driving career.  Remember that the disease is progressive and that even though the individual may be safe to drive today, their safe driving status is likely to decline over time.

Conclusion

Fortunately, much is being done to help find both the cause and a cure for this debilitating disease.  Earlier this year the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke held a conference in Bethesda, Maryland, titled “Parkinson’s Disease 2014: Advancing Research, Improving Lives,” in which they brought together leading neuroscience researchers, physicians, patients and caregivers to set aggressive priorities for Parkinson’s disease research.

The United Kingdom’s University of Nottingham is currently doing work that will lead to more effective brain scans for Parkinson’s patients.  In March, Rutgers University received a 3.4 million dollar grant from the National Institutes of Health to convene a study to further explore the brain for keys to solving Parkinson’s disease.

Matt Gurwell is a speaker, author, and expert on the issue of older drivers and drivers with certain disabilities.  He is also the founder of Keeping Us Safe, a national organization with a mission to provide assistance to older drivers and their families as they face the challenging issue of diminished driving skills.  Visit the Keeping Us Safe website at www.keepingussafe.org for more information on their services.    

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Have You Ever Thought of Becoming One of the Nation’s Certified “Beyond Driving with Dignity” Professionals?

Keeping us Safe Beyond Driving with DignityKeeping Us Safe has released the October schedule of introductory webinars for individuals interested in becoming one of the nation’s Certified “Beyond Driving with Dignity” Professionals.

The webinar is for qualifying professionals interested in:

  • Making a positive difference in your community
  • Learning a new skill that will challenge and reward you at the same time
  • Being challenged on an interpersonal level as you problem solve for families
  • Expanding the current marketing reach of your business or non-profit organization
  • Making yourself or your organization even more marketable to your internal and external customers?
  • Becoming part of an emerging, national team of experts in facilitating Keeping Us Safe’s “self-assessment program for older drivers™”?

In addition to saving lives, it is worthy to note that becoming certified in the “Beyond Driving with Dignity” program is an excellent way to further your personal revenue stream, or to further the professional revenue stream (and marketing efforts!) of your business or organization.

If you are interested in becoming part of our team, we cordially invite you to join us for this 45 minute, quick-paced, informational webinar on the benefits of becoming certified in this nationally-recognized program.  These complimentary webinars will be offered as follows:

  • October 3, 2014 at 11AM (EST)
  • October 9, 2014 at 3PM (EST)
  • October 15, 2014 at 5PM (EST)
  • October 21, 2014 at 11AM (EST)
  • October 30, 2014 at 3PM (EST)

To register for any one of the webinars please visit: http://keepingussafe.org/becomingacbddprofessional.htm.

For more information on the certification program you may also download our brochure at: http://keepingussafe.org/linked/brochurebddprofessionalcertification011314.pdf

To learn more about Keeping Us Safe’s programs, please visit our our website at http://www.keepingussafe.org.  Specific inquiries made be made by email at info@keepingussafe.org or by telephone at 877-907-8841.

 

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